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What Is Ptsd Stand For

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When To Seek Help For Ptsd

What is PTSD

A person who has experienced a traumatic event should seek professional help if they:

  • dont feel any better after two weeks
  • feel highly anxious or distressed
  • have reactions to the traumatic event that are interfering with home, work and/or relationships
  • are thinking of harming themselves or someone else.

Some of the signs that a problem may be developing are:

  • being constantly on edge or irritable
  • having difficulty performing tasks at home or at work
  • being unable to respond emotionally to others
  • being unusually busy to avoid issues
  • using alcohol, drugs or gambling to cope
  • having severe sleeping difficulties.

What Risks Are Associated With Ptsd

Alcohol and drug use

You might use drugs or alcohol to help you to manage your symptoms.

Drugs or alcohol can make you more unwell and more likely to try and harm yourself or take your own life.

Mental health conditions

Symptoms of PTSD can be made worse by other disorders such as:

  • depression
  • substance abuse, and
  • memory problems

Most people with PTSD will have at least 1 other mental health condition. The most common disorders are:

  • depressive disorders,
  • substance use disorders, and
  • anxiety disorders.

Other mental health conditions have the some of the same symptoms as PTSD. This may be why PTSD is hard to diagnose.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviours

In severe cases PTSD can last long enough and have a large impact on day to day life. This can cause suicidal thoughts and behaviours.

Physical health issues

PTSD has been linked to physical symptoms such as dizziness, tinnitus and blurry vision.

It has also been linked to physical illnesses such as heart disease, high blood pressure and obesity.

You can find more information about:

Drugs, alcohol and mental health by clicking here.Depression by clicking here.Suicidal feelings How to cope by clicking here.

What Are The Symptoms Of Ptsd

Some of the symptoms are PTSD and complex PTSD are:

  • reliving the experience through flashbacks, dreams or nightmares,
  • not being able to feel emotions,
  • dissociation. This could include disconnecting from yourself or other people,
  • negative alternations in mood,
  • negative self-perception such as feeling worthless or defeated,
  • hyperarousal such as anger, irritability or sleep issues,
  • hypervigilance such as feeling on constant alert. Or being overly sensory to stimulus such as smell and noise, and
  • avoidance. This could mean that you try to distract your thought from thinking about the trauma. Or you avoid situations that remind you of your trauma.

Is psychosis a symptom of PTSD?

There is a link between PTSD and psychosis. But it is not known if psychosis is a symptom of PTSD. Or a separate mental health condition.

You can find more information about psychosis by clicking here.

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Negative Changes In Thinking And Mood

Symptoms may include the following:

  • Negative thoughts about yourself or the world in general
  • A sense of hopelessness about future events
  • Trouble remembering things
  • Withdrawing socially and trouble to maintain close relationships
  • Social and emotional detachment
  • Loss of interest in hobbies or things you used to enjoy
  • Feelings of hollowness or being emotionally numb

Diagnostic And Statistical Manual

What does PTSD stand for?

PTSD was classified as an anxiety disorder in the DSM-IV, but has since been reclassified as a “trauma- and stressor-related disorder” in the DSM-5. The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for PTSD include four symptom clusters: re-experiencing, avoidance, negative alterations in cognition/mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity.

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Renaming Ptsd As Ptsi: Possible Impact

Both positive and negative potential impacts of changing the name of PTSD to PTSI have been noted. The main argument for the name change has focused around alleged PTSD stigma.;

While the former Army Vice Chief of Staff, Peter Chiarelli, states that he feels the word disorder is what inhibits veterans from seeking treatment, others have argued that changing the name without making any other modifications would not do anything to change the stigma.;Dr. Matthew Friedman, Senior Advisor at the National Center for PTSD, has challenged Chiarelli, citing how the military handles traumatized soldiers as the greatest contributor to PTSD stigma.;

What Are The Signs & Symptoms Of Ptsd

People with PTSD have symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression that include many of the following:

Intrusive thoughts or memories of the event

  • unwanted memories of the event that keep coming back
  • upsetting dreams or nightmares
  • acting or feeling as though the event is happening again
  • heartache and fear when reminded of the event
  • feeling jumpy, startled, or nervous when something triggers memories of the event
  • children may reenact what happened in their play or drawings

Avoidance of any reminders of the event

  • avoiding thinking about or talking about the trauma
  • avoiding activities, places, or people that are reminders of the event
  • being unable to remember important parts of what happened

Negative thinking or mood since the event happened

  • lasting worries and beliefs about people and the world being unsafe
  • blaming oneself for the traumatic event
  • lack of interest in participating in regular activities
  • feelings of anger, shame, fear, or guilt about what happened
  • feeling detached or estranged from people
  • not able to have positive emotions

Lasting feelings of anxiety or physical reactions

  • trouble falling or staying asleep
  • feeling cranky, grouchy, or angry
  • problems paying attention or focusing
  • always being on the lookout for danger or warning signs
  • easily startled

Signs of PTSD in teens are similar to those in adults. But PTSD in children can look a little different. Younger kids can show more fearful and regressive behaviors. They may reenact the trauma through play.

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What Does A Ptsd Attack Feel Like

A person with PTSD can also experience the physical sensations of panic attacks, such as heart palpitations, shortness of breath, and hot flashes. However, these attacks are brought on by the re-experiencing of the traumatic event through such experiences as dreams, thoughts, and flashbacks.

Impact Of Ptsd On Relationships And Day

The PTSD Definition Controversy – What is a Qualifying Trauma?

PTSD can affect a persons ability to work, perform day-to-day activities or relate to their family and friends. A person with PTSD can often seem disinterested or distant as they try not to think or feel in order to block out painful memories. They may stop them from participating in family life or ignore offers of help. This can lead to loved ones feeling shut out.

It is important to remember that these behaviours are part of the problem. People with PTSD need the support of family and friends, but may not think that they need help.

It is not unusual for people with PTSD to experience other mental health problems at the same time. In fact, up to 80 per cent of people who have long-standing PTSD develop additional problems – most commonly depression, anxiety, and alcohol;or othersubstance misuse. These may have developed directly in response to the traumatic event or have developed sometime after the onset of PTSD.

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Why Do Some People Develop Ptsd And Other People Do Not

It is important to remember that not everyone who lives through a dangerous event;develops PTSD. In fact, most people will not;develop the disorder.

Many factors play a part in whether a person will develop PTSD. Some examples are listed below. Risk factors make a person more likely to;develop PTSD. Other factors, called resilience factors, can help reduce the risk of the disorder.

Some factors that increase risk for PTSD include:

  • Living through dangerous events and traumas
  • Getting hurt
  • Feeling horror, helplessness, or extreme fear
  • Having little or no social support after the event
  • Dealing with extra stress after the event, such as loss of a loved one, pain and injury, or loss of a job or home
  • Having a history of mental illness or substance abuse

Some factors that may;promote recovery after trauma;include:

  • Seeking out support from other people, such as friends and family
  • Finding a support group after a traumatic event
  • Learning to feel good about ones own actions in the face of danger
  • Having a positive coping strategy, or a way of getting through the bad event and learning from it
  • Being able to act and respond effectively despite feeling fear

Researchers are studying the importance of these and other risk and resilience factors, including genetics and neurobiology. With more research, someday it may be possible to predict who is likely to;develop PTSD and to prevent it.

Who Is At Risk For Post

You can develop PTSD at any age. Many risk factors play a part in whether you will develop PTSD. They include

  • Your sex; women are more likely to develop PTSD
  • Having had trauma in childhood
  • Feeling horror, helplessness, or extreme fear
  • Going through a traumatic event that lasts a long time
  • Having little or no social support after the event
  • Dealing with extra stress after the event, such as loss of a loved one, pain and injury, or loss of a job or home
  • Having a history of mental illness or substance use

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Hyperarousal Signs Of Ptsd

Some signs of post-traumatic stress disorder have to do with the brain and bodys hyperarousal in the wake of a traumatic threat. Because the brain interprets the traumatic event as a present danger, natural fight-or-flight reactions become engaged and sometimes prolonged during re-experiencing of the event. In combination with general hypervigilance that so often accompanies PTSD, these signs of hyperarousal can amount to an exhausting and stressful experience for the survivor.

Insomnia is one PTSD symptom that is associated with hyperarousal. Many survivors with PTSD have significant difficulty falling asleep and staying in a deep sleep throughout the night. Due to persistent fears, some individuals with PTSD also sleep with the lights on, making it difficult to obtain a restful, REM-level of sleep.

Irritability is another symptom of hyperarousal, where survivors become prone to angry outbursts over slight issues. This may impact relationships and job performance. Many survivors also experience short-term memory difficulties, making focus, expression, and cognition a struggle.

How Can You Tell If Someone Has Ptsd

What does PTSD stand for?

Recognizing the Signs of Post-Traumatic Stress

  • Sleep Difficulties: Problems may include falling asleep, staying asleep, or experiencing frequent nightmares.
  • Anger: The person may feel irritable, and may experience frequent anger outbursts that are difficult to control.
  • Numbness and Disconnection: Trauma victims may feel disconnected from others.
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    Canadas Approach To Ptsd

    In Canada, the military approach to PTSD is to reduce the stigma around the condition. The Canadian military uses the term Operational Stress Injury to refer to a range of effects of the psychological trauma of warfare, including PTSD. Individuals with this diagnosis can receive the Canadian equivalent to the Purple Heart.;

    People who are opposed to changing the conditions name state that Canadas approach gives the best of both worlds: working to reduce stigma for military veterans without changing the diagnosis. The people who argue that the name should remain the same believe that changing the name would create undue confusion.;

    How Is It Diagnosed

    CPTSD is still a relatively new condition, so some doctors arent aware of it. This can make it hard to get an official diagnosis, and you might be diagnosed with PTSD instead of CPTSD. Theres no specific test for determining whether you have CPTSD, but keeping a detailed log of your symptoms can help your doctor make a more accurate diagnosis. Try to keep track of when your symptoms started as well as any changes in them over time.

    Once you find a doctor, theyll start by asking about your symptoms, as well as any traumatic events in your past. For the initial diagnosis, you likely wont need to go into too much detail if it makes you uncomfortable.

    Next, they may ask about any family history of mental illness or other risk factors. Make sure to tell them about any medications or supplements you take, as well as any recreational drugs you use. Try to be as honest as you can with them so they can make the best recommendations for you.

    If youve had symptoms of post-traumatic stress for at least a month and they interfere with your daily life, your doctor will likely start with a diagnosis of PTSD. Depending on the traumatic event and whether you have additional symptoms, such as ongoing relationship problems or trouble controlling your emotions, they may diagnose you with CPTSD.

    Keep in mind that you may need to see a few doctors before you find someone you feel comfortable with. This is very normal, especially for people dealing with post-traumatic stress.

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    Federal Framework On Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    The Federal Framework on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Recognition, Collaboration and Support connects and builds on existing federal efforts. It focuses on occupation-related PTSD, but also acknowledges other populations affected by PTSD.

    The Framework was developed to help:

    • improve tracking of PTSD and its economic and social costs;
    • promote and share guidelines and best practices for diagnosis, treatment and management of PTSD; and,
    • create and distribute educational materials.

    The Framework will be used to:

    • strengthen knowledge creation, knowledge exchange, and collaboration across the federal government, and with partners and stakeholders;
    • inform practical, evidence-based public health actions, programs and policies; and,
    • reduce stigma and improve recognition of the symptoms and impacts of PTSD.

    A review of the effectiveness of the Framework will be prepared within five years of its publication. The review will include a progress update and highlight new initiatives and their results.

    Trauma Avoidance Signs Of Ptsd

    What is EMDR? – Your Best Brain, Your Best Options

    Many survivors will avoid locations, people, or even topics of conversation that remind them of the traumatic event itself. Trauma avoidance signs of PTSD include an aversion to emotions, cognitions, or conversations about the traumatic experience, avoidance of places that cause reminders of the trauma and avoidance of hobbies or activities due to all of the fear surrounding the trauma.

    Dissociative symptoms also can set in during the brains attempts at avoidance, including sensations of depersonalization and derealization , as well as general emotional detachment and social alienation.

    Many PTSD survivors also find themselves detached from positive feelings, as the brain attempts to build an emotional wall, leaving them with feelings of emptiness or flat demeanors. Many PTSD survivors will also begin to ascribe to the belief that they will not live a full life due to their near-death experiences, causing a host of lifestyle issues as they may avoid long-term planning around jobs, careers, relationships or families.

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    What Are The Symptoms Of Ptsd In Children

    Children may have symptoms like those above or other symptoms. As children get older, their symptoms are more like those of adults. Here are some examples of PTSD symptoms in children and teens:

    • Children under 6 may get upset if their parents are not close by, have trouble sleeping, or act out the trauma in their play.
    • Children ages 7 to 11 may also act out the trauma through play, drawings, or stories. Some have nightmares or become more irritable or aggressive. They may also want to avoid school or have trouble with schoolwork or friends.
    • Children age 12 to 18 have symptoms more similar to adults: depression, anxiety, withdrawal, or reckless behavior like substance abuse or running away.

    What Can I Do If I Am Not Happy With My Treatment

    If you are not happy with your treatment you can:

    • talk to your doctor about your treatment options,
    • ask for a second opinion,
    • ask a relative, friend or advocate to help you speak your doctor,
    • contact Patient Advice and Liaison Service , or
    • make a complaint.

    There is more information about these options below.

    Treatment options

    You should first speak to your doctor about your treatment. Explain why you are not happy with it. You could ask what other treatments you could try.

    Tell your doctor if there is a type of treatment that you would like to try. Doctors should listen to your preference. If you are not given this treatment, ask your doctor to explain why it is not suitable for you.

    Second opinion

    A second opinion means that you would like a different doctor to give their opinion about what treatment you should have. You can also ask for a second opinion if you disagree with your diagnosis.

    You dont have a legal right to a second opinion. But your doctor should listen to your reason for wanting a second opinion.

    Advocacy

    An advocate is independent from the mental health service. They are free to use. They can be useful if you find it difficult to get your views heard.

    There are different types of advocates available. Community advocates can support you to get a health professional to listen to your concerns. And help you to get the treatment that you would like.

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    How Does Ptsd Happen

    During a trauma, your body responds to a threat by going into âflight or fightâ mode. It releases stress hormones, like adrenaline and norepinephrine, to give you a burst of energy. Your heart beats faster. Your brain also puts some of its normal tasks, such as filing short-term memories, on pause.

    PTSD causes your brain to get stuck in danger mode. Even after youâre no longer in danger, it stays on high alert. Your body continues to send out stress signals, which lead to PTSD symptoms. Studies show that the part of the brain that handles fear and emotion is more active in people with PTSD.

    Over time, PTSD changes your brain. The area that controls your memory becomes smaller. Thatâs one reason experts recommend that you seek treatment early.

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